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Can the words "pajlero" and "ŝalmo" be used to mean "drinking straw"? Are there any better options?

2 Answers 2

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"trinktubo", "trinktubeto", "suĉtubo", "suĉtubeto" seem like very realistic options, and the kind of Esperanto construction that would come to mind in an actual conversation. Neither "ŝalmo" nor "pajlero" are in the "Hejma Vortaro". The "Esperanta Bildvortaro" of Eichholz (1989) gives "suĉ-tubeto" (261/37).

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    I agree about those constructions being the most "realistic". Though I know the word ŝalmo it probably wouldn't come to mind as quickly as something like trinktubeto during conversation. And everyone will understand what trinktubeto means, meanwhile ŝalmo would probably have to be explained.
    – Kat Ño
    Oct 17, 2016 at 6:15
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I usually say suĉtubo. According to Wikipedia there is also the word trinkŝalmo.

I think pajlero is only a straw in the sense of a piece of straw, ie, the plant (ero de pajlo). Apparently people actually used to use this plant for this purpose so people also used to use that word for the concept. However I think seeing as they are now made of plastic it would be better to use a different word in Esperanto.

Ŝalmo appears to be a type of musical instrument, although PIV does have it as a drinking straw as well. It seems a little odd to me to use this word when the only real relation is that they both look like a tube, and there is already the word tubo for this purpose.

Having said that, suĉtubo doesn’t appear in Tekstaro at all. For ŝalmo it has this example (!):

Ni prefere enblovu al li aeron tra la anuso. Por tio oni bezonas nur ŝalmon.

As far as I can tell all of the examples for pajlero are about the plant rather than a drinking straw.

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  • "trinksxalmo" seems ridiculously close to the German "Trinkhalm": de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinkhalm . Oct 16, 2016 at 16:10
  • One of the examples under the definition for pajlero on vortaro.net is "trinki per pajlero; ☞ ŝalmo" which is why I thought it was another word for "drinking straw". Oct 16, 2016 at 18:28
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    I learned the word "trinkpajlero" just the other day on babadum.com. If it is wrong maybe someone should send a complaint. Oct 17, 2016 at 14:25

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