8

The phrase "It was worth it" is useful quite often, but I'm struggeling to express the idea in Esperanto. At a congress I once heard someone say "Mi unue ne volis vekiĝi frue por matenmanĝi, sed finfine decidis ja fari tion. Nun mi vidas, ke la manĝaĵo estas tre bona, ĝi vere meritis." Is that correct?

Kion diri kiam iu ago estis iel malfacila al oni, sed oni tamen ĝojas pri tio ke oni faris ĝin, pro la bonega rezulto. Ĉe kongreso mi iam aŭdis iun laŭdi la matenmanĝan bufedon. Li diris ion tian: "Mi unue ne volis vekiĝi frue por matenmanĝi, sed finfine decidis ja fari tion. Nun mi vidas, ke la manĝaĵo estas tre bona, ĝi vere meritis." Ĉu tio ĝustas?

Ekzemploj:

  • Daŭris multe da laboro, sed ...
  • Ĉu ... provi trian fojon?
  • La biletoj kostis al mi amason da mono, sed ...
9

A very common solution is to use the suffix -ind- as a verb root.

  • Daŭris multe da laboro, sed indis.
  • Ĉu indas provi trian fojon?
  • La biletoj kostis al mi amason da mono, sed indis.
4

Valoris la penon gets approximately 1000 google hits and is fully idiomatic. Its much rarer variation penvaloris gets less than 60 google hits, but exists as well. My feeling is that indi is best when it is part of a larger sentence:

Vere indas aĉeti la libron (a more marketing-oriented way of saying la libro estas vere aĉetinda, the book is worth buying)

OTOH, valori la penon is mostly used as an independent idiom:

Ĝi estis laborego, sed valoris la penon. It was a lot of work, but it was worth it (worth the pain).

I agree only partly with @JohannesMueller’s comment to another answer. He is right that tio valoris ĝin is unidiomatic, even if it appears at Tatoeba, and is translated as tio valoris la penon there. However, the problem is not that “the literal translation worth to valoro does not work out”: it does, as we have seen. The problem is deixis (deikto), and it is a subtle one: in most contexts, only one pronoun would be used. This is not a topic to discuss in this answer. I will limit myself to a final sentence which is fully idiomatic to my ears:

La suprengrimpado estas infera, sed la panoramo valoras ĝin. It’s a hell of a climb, but the view is worth it.

1

In your particular example, "worth"(noun) is used as an Adjective but acts as a Preposition. That's why it's normally followed by a Noun, a Pronoun or a Gerund. What you will find is worth it, used to describe something that has a value equivalent to what is being asked for it either in terms of money or effort. *English is idiomatic language, lots of phrases to learn by heart.

Tio valoris ĝin. It was worth it.

valoris: esti rigardata kiel inda je io, kiel ĝusta kompenso por io

Romo valoras viziton. Rome is worthy of a visit.

Estas admirinda. Worthy of praise.

Vi estas inda. You are worthy.

  • "Tio valoris ĝin" is unidiomatic. The literal translation "worth" to "valoro" does not work out. – Johannes Mueller Feb 13 '17 at 12:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.