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Someone used "memo" or "memeo" but I hardly agree either. The first is misguiding as "mem" means self, so "memo" makes people think "memo" is the noun form. "Memeo " is an unnecessary transliterated name and itself has no meaning. In an artificial and logical language we should always avoid increase the number of basic roots. So I have a suggest: according to its original meaning, the metaphor to sharing and passing away of ideas and behaviors, why we not use "kulturo-geno " or "ago-geno "? If some guy doesn't know "meme" but he can have intuitive understanding to the basic meaning at the sight of "kulturo-geno ". Could anyone suggest a good idea?

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    ”Meme” is memeo, as far as I know. :-) I don’t agree with you on this: ”In an artificial and logical language we should always avoid increase the number of basic roots.” Esperanto is a living language, and the number of roots has been increasing since Zamenhof released it. The word geno, as you suggest in ”kulturo-geno” and ”ago-geno”, did not originally exist in Esperanto. – Bjørn Feb 25 '17 at 8:21
  • @Bjørn Please answer to questions by using answers instead of comments. It is far more easier to search through answers. – Vanege Feb 25 '17 at 10:45
  • @Vanege – Ok, thanks. :-) I thought I wrote a comment, but I’ll paste it as an answer, then. – Bjørn Feb 25 '17 at 12:01
  • Possible duplicate of How do you say "a meme" in Esperanto? – Tomaso Alexander Feb 25 '17 at 17:48
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    After thinking, I think it is not a duplicate, this question is about the broader sense of "meme" (that can be applied to religions, languages and other cultural aspects), while the other question is specifically about an Internet meme. Even if it may not be the case here, the answers could have been different. – Vanege Feb 25 '17 at 20:53
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Like it or not memeo is here to stay. So is "meme" in the limited modern sense of "internet picture quote". The meaning from the 70's is often a surprise to people these days.

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”Meme” is memeo, as far as I know. :-) I don’t agree with you on this: ”In an artificial and logical language we should always avoid increase the number of basic roots.” Esperanto is a living language, and the number of roots has been increasing since Zamenhof released it. The word geno, as you suggest in ”kulturo-geno” and ”ago-geno”, did not originally exist in Esperanto.

  • (I originally posted this answer as a comment, see Vanege’s comment below the orig. question.) – Bjørn Feb 25 '17 at 12:02
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The word memeo is used on wikipedia. https://eo.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memeo

It does seem to be used a lot even though there is nothing official. If you don't like it, you can just called it a joke instead of a meme.

  • I believe this question was specifically about the 1976 definition of "meme" - distinct from the concept of "internet meme" which came much later -- so "joke" doesn't apply. – Tomaso Alexander Feb 27 '17 at 15:34

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