4

In german, you can do things like changing the SVO order of a phrase to OVS, thereby making the subject switch places with the object, and this is possible because the distinction between the two is made with the nominative/accusative. since esperanto has an accusative, is it possible to to the same thing? Theoretical example: La kafon trinkas mi.

  • What materials are you using to learn Esperanto. This question is usually answered in the lesson about the accusative in most books and courses. – Tomaso Alexander Aug 2 '17 at 22:16
  • This must certainly be true, but it might be that certain users aren't really learning Esperanto as such, but just are curious about a particular element of the language. I don't know if you meant to imply that the question should not have been asked because it's too elementary, but if so, we don't have such a rule in this StackExchange, right? Of course, to be fair, it might still be worth asking the question in case they are learning and turn out to be using materials that are faulty or low quality, so that we may suggest better ones. – Vincent Oostelbos Aug 2 '17 at 22:51
  • Also, since you're asking, the course i used was DuoLingo, which never explains any theory point. – Spooikypok_Dev Aug 5 '17 at 9:49
  • Tomaso, I don't understand what you mean. Spooikypok, How do you mean, it never explains "any theory point"? Anyway, presumably you used a mobile app version of Duolingo; the web version at least has tips and notes for each skill, some of the early ones of which do explain, among other things, that word order is generally quite free in Esperanto. – Vincent Oostelbos Aug 9 '17 at 15:22
  • Anyway, that's one question we aswered so it doesn't need to be answered again :) this had to happen one day... – Spooikypok_Dev Aug 15 '17 at 20:59
4

ENGLISH

Absolutely, you can. And you don't have to stick with either SVO or OVS, either. You can say VSO or VOS or SOV or OSV. Basically all six options. Examples (either known by me or found using Tekstaro):

SVO:

  • Io pelas min eterne (Unua Libro)
  • La patro skribas leteron (Dua Libro de l' lingvo Internacia)

SOV:

  • kiam la alilandulo sin movis (Dua Libro de l' lingvo Internacia)
  • Sed kiu do la reĝon serenigis? (Ifigenio en Taŭrido)

VSO:

  • Trovis mi patrujon ("Trovis Mi Patrujon", song by Anjo Amika)
  • Ricevis fil' de ter' la valon en hered' ("Trovis Mi Patrujon", song by Anjo Amika)

VOS:

  • Lasas lokon la aŭroro al la suno (Don Kiĥoto de la Manĉo en Barcelono)
  • Sekvis tion malkresko de la ŝtataj ŝuldoj (Artikoloj el Monato)

OSV:

  • Konsolon tempo donas al la koro (Hamleto)
  • Kulpan animon via vizaĝo perfidas. (Pro Iŝtar)

OVS:

  • Ĉion posedas li ("Trovis Mi Patrujon", song by Anjo Amika)
  • La samon faris senatoro Scevinus (Internacia krestomatio)

As Tomaso Alexander rightly points out in his answer, there is still a standard word order in Esperanto, SVO, but it is only by convention/for convenience (i.e. because most people use this order, it has become most easily understandable to many). Deviations from this word order are mostly done either in specific cases (for example, OSV is often seen when the object is tion, e.g. tion mi scias), to give emphasis to a particular phrase in a sentence, or for stylistic/poetic reasons. If one wishes, however, one can always choose to use any order, and it shouldn't ever be grammatically wrong.


ESPERANTO

Certe oni povas. Kaj oni eĉ ne devas uzi nur SVO aŭ OVS. Oni povas uzi VSO aŭ VOS aŭ SOV aŭ OSV, do fakte ĉiujn ses eblojn. Ekzemploj (aŭ konataj de mi aŭ trovitaj per Tekstaro):

SVO:

  • Io pelas min eterne (Unua Libro)
  • La patro skribas leteron (Dua Libro de l' lingvo Internacia)

SOV:

  • kiam la alilandulo sin movis (Dua Libro de l' lingvo Internacia)
  • Sed kiu do la reĝon serenigis? (Ifigenio en Taŭrido)

VSO:

  • Trovis mi patrujon ("Trovis Mi Patrujon", kanto de Anjo Amika)
  • Ricevis fil' de ter' la valon en hered' ("Trovis Mi Patrujon", kanto de Anjo Amika)

VOS:

  • Lasas lokon la aŭroro al la suno (Don Kiĥoto de la Manĉo en Barcelono)
  • Sekvis tion malkresko de la ŝtataj ŝuldoj (Artikoloj el Monato)

OSV:

  • Konsolon tempo donas al la koro (Hamleto)
  • Kulpan animon via vizaĝo perfidas. (Pro Iŝtar)

OVS:

  • Ĉion posedas li ("Trovis Mi Patrujon", kanto de Anjo Amika)
  • La samon faris senatoro Scevinus (Internacia krestomatio)

Kiel ĝuste diras Tomaso Alexander en sia respondo, ja estas kutima vortordo en Esperanto, SVO, sed nur estas pro konvencio/por oportuneco (t.e. ĉar la plimulto da homoj uzas tiun ordon, ĝi fariĝis plej facile komprenebla al multaj). Devioj de ĉi tiu vortordo okazas plejparte aŭ en specifaj kazoj (ekzemple OSV ofte videblas kiam la objekto estas tion, ekz. tion mi scias), por montri pli altan gravecon de iu frazeto en frazo, aŭ pro stilaj/poeziaj kialoj. Se oni volas, oni tamen ĉiam rajtas elekti ajnan ordon, kaj devus neniam esti gramatike erare.

| improve this answer | |
3

Yes. In fact, it's very common for people to read in a basic lesson that 'word order doesn't matter" in Esperanto (in terms of SVO, OSV, OVS, and so on) and jump to the conclusion that word order doesn't matter at all in Esperanto.

Word order is fairly standard in Esperanto - SVO, adjectives come before nouns - but there is some flexibility which can be used to avoid wordy phrasings or add emphasis. The best way to pick this up is by reading lots of good Esperanto.

| improve this answer | |
1

I believe the answer is yes. It works

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.