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There seems to be several words in Esperanto that all correspond to the English verb "to share". Right now I can think of dividi, diskonigi and kunhavi. I'd love to see a collection of them all, and in which situations to use which ones.

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  • What about in the context of "sharing experience" or "sharing a story"? Oct 7, 2016 at 23:46

5 Answers 5

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  • dividi - to divide something into smaller pieces.
  • kundividi - to share those pieces with other people. (everyone gets a bit)
  • havigi - to make other people have something. In other words, to give, make available, provide, etc.
  • kunhavigi - To make something common property of you and other people, without dividing it into pieces.

Notes:

  • dividi is often used for kundividi

(Please comment for imprecisions or errors)

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  • 4
    Awesome paint skills! ;) Although not very user-friendly for colorblind people. Could each stick-man have a label A/B/C somewhere close to its hear or body? Sep 1, 2016 at 10:54
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    @LazarLjubenović Hopefully someone with good drawing skills will do it. (Which I don't have)
    – Vanege
    Sep 1, 2016 at 20:27
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    @LazarLjubenović Going by colorblind simulations using Color Oracle, it's actually not bad as is. Mostly because the green person on the left is a noticably darker color than the red one on the right. Here is a simulation for the most common type of color blindness. For the next two most common types the difference is in fact even better to see.
    – Raizin
    Oct 18, 2016 at 18:39
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    @Vanege - Maybe add a short description in words along with the picture to make it clear for people who don't fully understand what it means. For example: dividi - to divide something into smaller pieces. kundividi - to share those pieces with other people. (everyone gets a bit) havigi - to make other people have something. In other words, to give, make available, provide, etc. kunhavigi - To make something common property of you and other people, without dividing it into pieces.
    – Raizin
    Oct 18, 2016 at 18:52
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    Oh, and "dishavigi" is actually to distribute something to a large amount of people. "dis-" means more or less "in many/all directions" (disdoni, diskonigi, disflui, etc.) or "into lots of small pieces" (disfali, disperdi, etc.)
    – Raizin
    Oct 18, 2016 at 18:57
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This question was discussed in the Facebook group Duolingo Esperanto Learners.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/duolingo.esperanto.learners/permalink/550406195121402/

There was some disagreement among the fluent speakers about how far the word dividi could be pushed without being considered an anglicism.

There are certainly many examples of dividi being used with thoughts, experience, expertise, and objects that are not chopped up and parted out. Based on examples found in the Tekstaro, dividi can be used with fate, thoughts, remarks, danger, happiness, and opinions

As for "sharing" things on Facebook, the term diskonigi is in use - possibly due to Richard Delemore's use of the term in his Evildea videos. Note that different social media use different expressions for this action. Certainly dividi and reafiŝi could also work.

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  • What about just "afiŝi"? With the "re-" I expect a repeated action. Jan 26, 2017 at 0:31
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    Repeated one time. Someone posts. You post it a second time. That's what "re" means. Jan 26, 2017 at 16:59
  • Yes. "share" can be both "share my own thoughts" (afiŝi) and share someone else's post (reafiŝi). English is so imprecise. :-P Jan 26, 2017 at 17:16
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    tweet and retweet. Afisxi kaj reafisxi. Jan 26, 2017 at 17:19
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The anglicism "divide" for "sharing" is already present in many languages in which "share" and "divide" have the same meaning.

Let's check the original sources:

  • komun' commun | common | gemeinsam | общій | ogólny, wspólny.
  • divid' diviser, partager | divide | theilen | дѣлить | dzielić.
  • part' partie, part | part | Theil | часть | część.
  • kon' connaître | know (by experience or study), recognise | kennen | знать (быть знакомымъ) | znać.
  • kun avec | with, (kune) together | mit | съ | z
  • ig' make something like, apply attribute to something
  • dis' make something separated

So:

  • komunig' => make common
  • partig' => make partitioned
  • konig' => make known
  • havig' => make having
  • kundivid' => divide/split together
  • disdivid' => divide/split into pieces
  • diskonig' => make known into pieces
  • kunhavig' => make having together (share ownership)
  • kunkonig' => make known together (share knowledge)

Is kunhavig' actually a good word for sharing in social? "Hav'" suggests ownership but by "sharing" things on the internet the ownership does not change.

Kunkonig' looks better and more exact solution (make-known-together). Google Translate has it and translates exactly to what it means.

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Popartigi. (Sharing : giving each one his share). Dispartigi. (Sharing : distribution) kunpartigi (sharing in common). Partajxo. (A share). Partajxi. (Sharing in general). Popartajxo. (Contribution).

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Common for those forms of sharing that Vanege illustrated is that something is concretely or figuratively divided or split into parts.

In contrast if you share information, it is not split but rather the same information becomes available to others. For this kind of sharing there is a lot of variation. Some use havigi, but like the verb prunti, is not clear whether havigi results in that you have something ("make someone to act that you have") or the others ("make others to have"). Others use komunigi, but PIV has an example komunigi la kampojn de vilaĝo which leads one to think about somekind of co-owning.

Among the "best" is diskonigi as introduced by Evildea like Tomaso Alexander said. I personally prefer partodoni which the translation team of Joomla has chosen according to Stella Lindblom, the head of the Esperanto translation team of Joomla.

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