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In a Duolingo discussion I came across, that people understand the word sandviĉo differently. For me the default type is what seems to be called in English open or open-face sandwich, that is one slice with some topping. In some parts of the world the word sandwich refers exclusively to layered bread, i.e. at least two slices with some filling between them. There also seems to be countries, where the word sandwich is reserved for layered breads with some particular filling.

The Esperanto word sandviĉo appears to cover all types of sandwiches. How do you specify the type if necessary? Wikipedia has an article of sensupropana sandviĉo for the open type one, but that name sounds very clumsy (and malferma just strange) to me. Would tavola sandviĉo be understood for a layered, two-sliced sandwich? What other alternatives are there?

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  • Interestingly, the corresponding linked German article for Wikipedia's "open sandwich" / "sensupropana sandviĉo" is the Swedish-derived "Smörgås" (which I've never heard of in German), despite German-speaking countries having their own longstanding tradition of bread-with-topping(s)-but-without-another-slice-of-bread-on-top meals. (E.g. Brotzeit, Vesper or just Butterbrot). – das-g Feb 22 '20 at 14:06
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Considering every culture/country seems to have their own version of the meaning of sandwich, i'd say you'll always have to eventually clarify what kind of sandwich you're after. To me, it's two layers of bread with stuff in the middle...

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Vesperto is right. On another forum I received an answer from a member of Lingva Konsultejo of la Akademio de Esperanto Harri Laine that words like buterpano and sandviĉo can freely be used for different smörgås and sandwiches since you most likely have to clarify anyway what kind of bread you are after. In other words do not asume that these words mean the same kind of bread for all.

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