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George Orwell doesn't appear to have hated Esperanto, though he seems to have feared the potential for abuse found in a universal language. He was exposed to Esperanto through a friend of his aunt, Eugene Adam, who was, according to Robert Plank, "so enthusiastic about Esperanto that he did not willingly speak any other tongue." Plank continues: There ...


11

“It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” ― Yogi Berra My first thought when I saw your question was that there may well come a day when nobody is interested in Esperanto. That might be 100 years off. It might be 200. Who knows? When I saw that you said "30 years" - I think that's very simple. There will still be a lot of interest in ...


10

It seems to be based on personal experience. Here are several links that give some background: http://www.autodidactproject.org/other/orwell-esperanto1.html http://www.englishlanguagefaqs.com/2013/06/what-is-esperanto-and-why-did-george.html And [a]pparently, Orwell, during his down-and-out phase in Paris, had to accept a room in the lodgings of a cousin. ...


7

TL;DR Yes, Esperanto has been relatively stabile over the last decade and the small data I could find suggests that the demographic will not seriously change that. A measure of the popularity of esperanto is the relative number of searches on google for esperanto. The y-axis is the relative popularity of the search term esperanto divided by the relative ...


5

No sound statistics. Esperanto has a community, also among the youth, also wide-spread. It also has its own worth as a language one can acquire to a high degree. It will certainly last for at least a century. But for being a self-motivated Esperanto speaker one should seek a congress once a year or plan other activities. So I think self-motivation is the ...


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