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17

The diacritic letters are part of the unchangeable norm (Fundamento de Esperanto). They will not go away whatever people may think. Based on the experience of the past 130 years, the chances of a spelling reform in Esperanto are zero. In the Fundamento there is an alternative without diacritics for the cases the latter can not be used properly: ch gh jh hh ...


10

A real reform in the sense of replacing language elements by new elements has taken place in 1888, when Zamenhof, after an idea by Edgar von Wahl, in his "Aldono al la Dua Libro" changed the temporal correlatives from -an to -am in order to avoid a collision with the accusative singular of the correlatives ending in -a (kian - kia'n). From time to time the ...


9

Ĉar estas du vitroj kaj nur unu pantalono kaj nur unu ilo por tondi. Diversaj lingvoj traktas tiajn aferojn malsame. "Logike" tamen, unu parto de tondilo ne povas tondi kaj sekve ne povas esti tondilo. Pantolono ja havas du krurumojn, sed ĉemizo ja havas du manikojn. Tio tute ne gravas.


8

Step 1: Write out the reform in great detail. Produce a body of work in the reform to make it immediately useful. Step 2: Fall in love with a rich woman (or man) with a dowry. Step 3: Use the dowry to publish your work. Step 4: Wait for people to give it a cool name. Step 5: Wait another 130 years.


6

In my (personal) opinion, based on practical needs and on the Fundamento itself (the antaŭparolo), you would need to make sure you are only adding to the language, not removing anything and changing as little as possible. It'll help a lot if it's something that's already widely used. You would need to be very careful not to invalidate everything that's been ...


4

Jen okulvitro! ………………………………………………………………………


3

There is absolutely no chance of this happening. The history of Esperanto from Day #1 after its publication has shown that people immediately "want to make it better", but only in the idiosyncratic way that they themselves feel would be an improvement. Esperanto was presented to the world essentially as a finished product. It was never a language project ...


2

But most search engines, including the browser search, does not distinguish between 's' and 'ŝ', so it IS a nuisance somewhat. Then the problem you are mentioning would be resolved with a better adaptation of this tools to linguistics reality, rather than the other way. You should get in touch with people working at improving this tools, or find a better ...


2

If you're asking whether new elements have ever come into Esperanto, then clearly the answer is yes. As just one random example that came up in a recent discussion, the word pigra used to be found only in lists of alternatives to "mal-words." (In this case, as an alternative to maldiligenta.) Now it's an ordinary Esperanto word.


2

Reminds me of the five-year plan to improve English spelling to make it the official language of the EU, rather than German: In the first year, "s" will replace the soft "c". Sertainly, this will make sivil servants jump for joy. The hard "c" will be dropped in favour of the "k", which should klear up some konfusion and allow one key less on ...


1

There is indeed either accented letters or letter combinations. Consider that most languages with latin script (like Vietnamese) do have accents - with a certain pride -, and the Cyrillic script and its transcript uses more letters (ц ч dž ž ш for c ĉ ĝ ĵ ŝ). Cyrillic script of for instance Bulgarian is officially transcripted to Latin with accents too. The ...


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