Oliver Mason
  • Member for 5 years, 5 months
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Why is Esperanto popular in Iran?
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22 votes

Apparently it was promoted after the Iranian revolution in 1979: Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran called on Muslims to learn Esperanto and praised its use as a medium for better understanding among ...

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Why is "da" used in this question?
10 votes

Kiom is used without da in questions such as Kiom estas la duoblo de 6?, or Kiom estas la tempo?. It can be translated as "how much" followed by a numerical expression (algebraic, or of time): "How ...

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Did the writer George Orwell hate Esperanto, and why if it is the case?
10 votes

It seems to be based on personal experience. Here are several links that give some background: http://www.autodidactproject.org/other/orwell-esperanto1.html http://www.englishlanguagefaqs.com/2013/06/...

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Why do some compound words leave out the "o"?
9 votes

I would assume it's simply a phonological matter: you cannot easily pronounce *skribtablo because of the two successive plosives. It is of course perfectly possible, but skribotablo is somewhat easier ...

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How many prepositions in a row are possible in Esperanto?
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9 votes

Prepositions usually occur in front of a noun phrase, so the only way there can be more than one in a row is if the noun phrase itself is a prepositional phrase, as in the example He looked up from ...

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How good is Google Translate for Esperanto?
8 votes

I use it regularly as a 'backup' when reading tweets in Esperanto. It seems to have some problems with compound words, and I wouldn't always trust it with translation into Esperanto. For the other ...

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Is learning Esperanto inherently more difficult for Asians than Europeans?
8 votes

This article, "Esperanto as language and idea in China and Japan", seems to imply that it's not particularly hard to learn for non-Western speakers (see comment for full PDF version). In fact, in 1907 ...

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Anthropomorphism in Esperanto
7 votes

It's a rhetorical figure (metonymy), which is not related to any particular language, so I see no reason why it should not work in Esperanto. See the Wikipedia Entry on Metonymy; the relationship ...

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Where can I find free Esperanto audiobooks?
7 votes

The only one I could find after some searching is https://librivox.org/la-aventuroj-de-alicio-en-mirlando-by-lewis-carroll/

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What is the difference between "neŭtra" and "neŭtrala"?
7 votes

According to JC Wells' dictionary, neŭtra is "neuter", ie something neither masculine nor feminine, mostly in grammar. I guess you could say La veterinaro neŭtrigis la katon for a non-grammar example. ...

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Fiĝioj vs Fiĝio: When should island groups have the plural ending?
6 votes

It depends what the term actually refers to, a political or a geographical entity. Japanujo refers to the country, not the physical islands; hence it is in the singular. The same would apply to Malto ...

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What are the rules of abbreviating words in Esperanto?
6 votes

JC Wells provides a list of "Some Esperanto Abbreviations" in his dictionary; they look fairly standard to me from an English perspective, and it's hard to derive any rules/regularities from that list....

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SAMPA and IPA pronunciation of Esperanto letters
6 votes

Not to my knowledge for SAMPA. Tables of SAMPA transcriptions exist for several languages, and one for Esperanto should be easy to construct. An example for English is here: http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/...

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How do I say "nowadays" in Esperanto?
6 votes

JC Wells gives nun(temp)e for nowadays. He's got nun as now, so either nune ("at the time of now") or nuntempe seems adequate for nowadays, or in this time. But I'm still just a komencanto.

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How are animal names translated into Esperanto?
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5 votes

When you are 100% sure there is no existing translation, do a bit of research and see how that animal is named in different language families. For example, the kingfisher is Eisvogel in German, ...

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Where to learn Esperanto?
5 votes

I would recommend Duolingo; this teaches you both words and grammar, translating in both directions.

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Which letter would be hardest to avoid in an Esperanto lipogram?
5 votes

I guess it would have to be s, as it it used in any verb ending apart from the infinitive and the imperative. But o is also hard to avoid if you want to use any nominals.

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Kial nomiĝas la pilko en futbalo 'piedpilko', kaj ne futbalpilko?
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5 votes

Presumably for the same reason that korbopilko is a basketball: it is more descriptive. With piedpilko you know it's a ball related to kicking by foot, and you know that even if you don't know the ...

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What is the proper way to pronouce EJ?
5 votes

ej represents e plus a short i-sound; it is like English ay in play Wells, JC, Esperanto Dictionary

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If I can't find a word in Vortaro.net, should I cease using that word?
5 votes

My personal opinion would be that it's alright, as you have not introduced any new roots, but just combined two existing ones. As long as the meaning is clear, including for people with other native ...

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How do you say "sunburn" in Esperanto?
5 votes

JC Wells in his Esperanto Dictionary translates it as sunbruno, and, as you suggest, sunfrapo is a sunstroke.

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How common are custom words?
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5 votes

I do not have any figures for frequency of such words, but I can provide a psychological reason for why I believe them to be rare. Common words are easier to process during communication. If, however,...

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What is the difference between "Mia onklo venas sane" and "Mia onklo venas sana"?
5 votes

In general the adverb (-e) modifies the verb, so the sentence could be translated My uncle comes in a healthy way (eg walks without a limp). The adjective (-a) modifies the noun, so My uncle comes (...

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What are examples of Esperanto-given names?
5 votes

Any name can be 'esperantised', usually by adding an -o, and transliterating the sounds with the respective Eo approximations. Double letters seem to be dropped. I'm just looking at Chris Gledhill's ...

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How to translate “backstop”?
4 votes

It is always tricky to translate words which are very specific to a given culture or situation, which might not be known to many potential speakers who will come across that particular term. Most non-...

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Double letters in Esperanto
4 votes

Pollando is only a double letter due to a morpheme boundary: /pol-land-o/ ("Land of the Poles"). So one should probably pronounce the two /l/s as separate letters. According to my (1977) copy of JC ...

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Does Esperanto evolve?
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4 votes

This is an interesting issue, and in a way Esperanto is a field study in linguistic evolution. Languages change because they are spoken within groups of people, and accidental or deliberate changes ...

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Kiu nivelo de domo estas la "unua etaĝo"?
4 votes

I don't think that is a language-related issue as much as a cultural convention. There is a difference in British English and American English, and according to Wikipedia the main distinction goes ...

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How do you say “phonestheme” in Esperanto?
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4 votes

I would approach this using the same etymology as the original ('sound' + 'perception') to make it sonpercepto.

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Kie oni povus legi la originalan Kumeŭaŭa-n en Esperanto?
4 votes

You can get it here, for example. Vi povas aĉeti ĝin ĉi tie. Currently also as a paperback on amazon.com.

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