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There are several uses for the word "Mindful" and "Mindfulness". Both, in the modern sense, relate to the practice of being present. This state of mind is usually associated with meditation practices.

I have failed to find an equivalent in other sources. The only close translation is Zorgi. However, this translation fails to convey the act of detachment from our own thoughts and feelings. The PIV, in fact, mentions this definition: Maltrankviliĝi pro necerteco aŭ dubeco de io, kion oni opinias grava. Which is totally contrary to what is meant.

What do you think is a better way to convey this mindstate and its related practices?

UPDATE

I would like to thank everyone who helped me decide what term to use.

I think that I will use plenatentemiĝo.

I like this word a lot because it is only Esperanto based and it conveys what I understand for the term. It includes -em and -iĝ which implies that this form of training would help one acquire the tendency to be completely attentive and aware.

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Vikipedio uses the translation “Plenatenta meditado” which I find to be a well-fitting translation.

The article itself contains a discussion of possible translations.

  • This article by Herbert A. Welker (the author of the article plenatenta meditado in vikipedio) is also worth reading. – Vidamuzo Dec 19 '17 at 19:21
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The timing of this question is interesting because I am currently listening to Waking Up Podcast #102 - a conversation with Sam Harris and Robert Wright on just this topic. They touch on the concept as it's understood in at least two different Eastern traditions - and also touch on how the concept is misunderstood by people who have tried it but never achieve Mindfulness - so what they are calling Mindfulness is really just relaxing and thinking.

My reaction to the question is that we should take a step back from the word "Mindfulness" and look to see how this idea is expressed in the original traditions. We can then go forward from there.

Unfortunately, the term sati (from the language Pali) can't simply be Esperantized because satio is already the Esperantization of the unrelated practice of sati or widow burning.

Actually the request to translate the term "without losing meaning" is interesting in and of itself. I will submit that the term "mindfulness" (uppercase or lowercase M) is already unclear, and must be imbued with appropriate meaning before the topics can be discussed. In it's simplest form (be mindful of the cars when you cross the street) it just simply means to pay attention. The original word sati seems to mean simply "to remember."

This article (budhano) seems to call it simply Atento al Spirado.

  • Thank you for your answer. I think that I will use plenatentemiĝo. I like this word a lot because it is only Esperanto based and it conveys what I understand for the term. It includes -em and -iĝ which implies that this form of training would help one acquire the tendency to be completely attentive and aware. – juanmonroynieto Dec 21 '17 at 15:24
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    That's the worst choice of the ones I've seen presented here. It (plenatentemiĝo) means "becoming inclined to want to be fully attentive." – Tomaso Alexander Dec 21 '17 at 16:46
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I would use atentemo, with the broken down meaning of "inclination to be attentive", which I think is what you are aiming for. I think that this would work well even outside of a "meditation" context.

Mindful: atentema as in Ŝi ĉiam estas atentema pri sia medio.

Mindfulness: atentemo as in Kiam mi meditas, mi fartas tre atentemo.

If you are looking at something more inword focused, as in being mindful of one's self, then your can build something like mematentemo as "tending to be attentive to the self", or animemo "tending to the spirit". The feeling behind mindful leads me toward the -em suffix.

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    Atenta is attentive in the sense of paying attention in a given moment. Atentema is having the general proclivity to pay attention -- which I would also call "attentive." – Tomaso Alexander Dec 21 '17 at 16:54

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